AT&T Going Mobile workshop helps seniors with cell phones

Going Mobile

 

According to Pew Research Center, older adults face unique barriers to technology adoption, ranging from affordability to physical challenges to a lack of comfort and familiarity with technology. As mobile technology becomes more prevalent it is ever more important for all of us — older adults included — to understand its use in order to stay connected to loved-ones and remain safe.

Most smartphones and other mobile devices have capabilities that can actually enhance our lives — from storing emergency information to quickly call for help to special features to monitor certain health activities and biometrics. Some come equipped with assistive features such as captions for those with hearing problems. Newer devices such as Apple Watch and Fitbit® are making health, wellness and safety integral parts of our daily routines. Although there are barriers, Pew Research found that 58 percent of people over age 65 now say that technology has a positive impact on society while only 4 percent say it’s negative.

“Mobile technology can play such an important role in helping to avoid isolation as we age,” says Mark Romito, Director of External Affairs for AT&T.  “It keeps us connected with loved-ones, and it can make a life-altering difference for people if they become comfortable using mobile devices.”

Don’t let mobile technology scare you just because you may not feel confident using it. AT&T can help make the use of these devices easier with our upcoming Going Mobile workshop — a free, hands-on training to learn how to better use and make the most of cell phones and/or tablets to keep you informed, safe and healthy. 

Sign up for Going Mobile today!

Wednesday, June 28, 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Caldwell House Senior Living Community

2900 Corporate Drive

Troy, OH

Bring your questions about devices, regardless of service provider.

To sign up, or for more information, contact Emily Gamble, Development Coordinator, at 937.610.7008, or egamble@alz.org 

Click here to learn more about technology and older adults.

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